Why Not Fly?

Mark Johnston, Connections Pastor 

RobinThe other morning, while I was drinking my coffee, I looked out the back door and saw a bird, a male robin, walking down the sidewalk, like he was just out for a stroll. It seemed a little strange, so I watched him for a minute. He had a twig in his mouth, which I assumed was going to be used for a nest. Now, our yard is a veritable Home Depot of bird nest building materials, with a dozen or so trees, that drop limbs every time there’s a light breeze in the forecast. There’s a majestic old pecan, some stately oaks, and a few catalpa trees, which I’m convinced line the banks of the mythical river Styx in Hell, dropping crap year ‘round.

Anyway, the bird walked, slowly, like an elderly person, along the sidewalk from our shed to the driveway, a good twenty feet or so, probably looking to do some sort of twig upgrade. It was a long enough distance that I started to wonder if there was something wrong with him, maybe a problem with one of his wings, so I sat down my coffee mug, opened the door, and startled him, so he took off into the air. (And yes, honey, I used a coaster.)

So, after he flew off, I started to wonder, “why in the world would you walk when you can fly?”

As people, most of us dream of having the ability to fly. Some folks literally have flying dreams at night. (I’ve unfortunately never been one of those people, and have always been kind of envious of them. Instead, I get drowning dreams.) Here was this little guy, blessed by his Creator with an ability so amazing—one that he takes for granted, and that his peanut-sized brain can’t really fathom—walking to his destination instead of soaring in the clouds like you and I would do, just for a minute, even if we had no reason to do so.

He’d been blessed with a gift from God, and wasn’t using it.

As believers, we have also been given something incredible—the indwelling of the Holy Spirit of God Himself. (1 Corinthians 3:16-17) Think about it. In Old Testament times, God’s Spirit dwelled in the Tabernacle, or later, in the Temple, once it was constructed. The indwelling of the Spirit in people in the Old Testament was selective and it was temporary. 

The Spirit “came upon” people like Joshua (Numbers 27:18), David (1 Samuel 16:12-13) and even Saul (1 Samuel 10:10). In the book of Judges, we see the Spirit “coming upon” the various judges whom God raised up to deliver Israel from their oppressors. The Holy Spirit entered into these folks for specific tasks and for certain periods of time. This indwelling was a sign of God’s favor (in the case of David), and if they fell out of God’s favor, the Spirit would depart (Saul in 1 Samuel 16:14).

It was not until Pentecost in Acts 2, that the Holy Spirit, as Jesus had promised to the disciples before He ascended into heaven, filled the believers. Not as a temporary blessing, but a permanent one.

“When the day of Pentecost arrived, they were all together in one place. And suddenly there came from heaven a sound like a mighty rushing wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. And divided tongues as of fire appeared to them and rested on each one of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance.” (Acts 2:1-4)

From that point on, the once timid disciples, the very same men who ran and hid when the authorities arrived that night in Gethsemane, spoke boldly of the risen Christ, with no fear of arrest, persecution or even death. They had spent three years walking alongside Jesus in his ministry, witnessing his miracles, hearing his teachings, but it was the indwelling of the Spirit that really changed them.

So in the Old Testament, outside of a few special instances, the Holy Spirit did not live inside God’s people, and when it did, it was only for a season. As incredible as that sounds, you and I have something that Noah, Moses, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Daniel, David, Elijah and Elisha did not—the very Spirit of God living inside us.

Picture yourself in Heaven, finding one of your Old Testament heroes…Moses, for example. Excitedly, you ask him what it was like to see the burning bush, to lead God’s people out of bondage, showing God’s power to the rulers of Egypt, or receive the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai.

What if Moses’ response was something like, “yeah that was cool and all, but I want to know what it was like to have the Holy Spirit living inside you?”

Imagine his reaction be to our typical American Christian answer of “you know…It really didn’t affect me a whole lot. In our culture we liked to shop for clothes and binge TV shows on this thing called Netflix and I worked a lot so we could have a bigger house and nicer cars, and go on vacations and cruises and attend sporting events.”

Church, we have the indwelling of Holy Spirit, and we’re walking around picking up twigs to build bigger nests. 

I can’t help but feel that we will one day look back at our fascination with the shiny objects this world has to offer—sex, materialism, even the ‘your best life now’ promise of the TV preachers with nothing but regret and remorse. It’s like we are the Indians, trading the Island of Manhattan for a few dollars worth of trinkets.

God wants so much more for us, as his beloved children. Not ‘blessings’ in the way so many have been taught to think of them, so much as the abundant life of obedience. Of dying to ourselves in order to live for Him, to take up our crosses and follow. To see those in need, and truly hurt for them, share their burdens, and do our part to help lift them up, sharing our own stories of redemption as part of someone else’s healing process.

That’s what the church should be. 

As Hebrews 12:1-2 says “Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God”

Church, we have the Spirit of God. Why are we walking?

3 thoughts on “Why Not Fly?

  1. MARK! This is by far my favorite!!!! I’m sitting in this teeeeeeeeeny tiny apartment in Beijing bawling my eyes out!!! Oh my goodness, what would I say if Joshua (my bible hero) asked me what it was like to have the spirit of God with me at all times?!?! How am I walking with every bit of authority given to me in this country?! WHOA. This is good. Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Thank you Mark for giving us much to think about. I do have one question, exactly how old does one have to be to be considered ‘elderly’? Think very carefully before answering 😘

    Liked by 1 person

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