The Prodigal Do-Over

Outdoors Backpack Hat Man Guy People LifestyleRandal Brewer, Stonepoint Member

We are all familiar with the story of the Prodigal Son told in Luke 15:11-32. Most of us are familiar with a variety of spins on the parable that have been written in books or taught in countless sermons. We’ve been told that the story is equally about the older brother that was angry about the father’s grace and mercy. There’s a really good Tim Keller book, Prodigal God, about the prodigious love of the father. 

As Christians we need to have a good grasp about the younger son, because we are him. No matter who you are, you are him. I certainly am.

Recently, my identification with the prodigal son has been a comfort to me, because I need a Do-Over. I need a bunch of them. This is the most beautiful thing about the story. The big Do-Over. The Do-Over begins with, “When he came to his senses…” (verse 17). I’m really good at coming to my senses, I’m just poor at the timing. I usually come to my senses after I’ve been knocked senseless. It’s a God thing, I think.

Don’t we all need a Do-Over? Not just that initial act of believing in Christ and understanding our sin and our need for a Savior. It keeps going, or at least it does for me. I need a financial Do-Over. I need a spiritual Do-Over. I need a professional Do-Over. I can conceive of some parental Do-Overs that would be good. When it comes to marriage, I’d Do-It-All-Over Again. (Hey baby, gotcha.)

I’ve come to my senses, again. A Do-Over sounds good to me. Now I understand, Lord. I see the light. I can’t undo what has been done, but we can start fresh from here, right? A little Master-of-the-House manipulation on Your part, and we’re good to go, right? I mean, what’s the use of my sin being as far as the east is from the west, or Your prodigious forgetfulness if we can’t have the big fresh and fuzzy Do-Over now?

In this contemplation and fervent prayer, God revealed to me the story found in the minor prophet book of “I’maguy-a.” It’s a short book, and very hard to find, but if you want to pause here and look it up…or it might be quicker if I give you the Cliff Notes version. “I’maguy-a” tells what Paul Harvey would refer to as, The Rest of the Story.

You see, everything wasn’t happily ever after for the Prodigal Son just because he found himself back in the good graces of his merciful father. Oh, it went well for a while. He was excited to get up early and work the ranch. The labor even felt good for a while. He was sufficiently contrite and deferential toward his older brother and amends were made. They laughed again remembering the old days. 

Speaking of the old days, one of the servant girls who was a child when he left was not a child any longer. She was a beautiful young woman. She laughed at his jokes. She appreciated his generosity toward her father and family. In fact, the Prodigal Son had become a favorite among the hired hands. He worked with them and treated them well. They liked him much more than the older brother.

Word of the Prodigal Son’s return reached the neighboring ranches, and when he would run into the family members or servants of those ranches, they congratulated him on his return and were happy to see the rumors of his new life were true. They remembered when he was younger and had held such promise, and such rebellion.

After a while, his responsibilities increased and he led a small caravan into town to engage in trade for his father, and while he was there ran into some of his old party pals from the days of riotous living. They invited him to buy them drinks, but he said ‘no thank you.’ Instead, he directed the caravan to edge of town and set up camp. He sat next to a fire and after the meal was served he contemplated his life and his mind found the rabbit trails of “How Do You Like Me Now?”.

He thought about the servant girl and wondered what everybody would think if he married her instead of the daughter of the wealthy neighbor his parents were planning on. What would his brother say if their inheritance was intruded upon again, this time by a family of former servants? What about the other ranchers in the area? Did they really think that highly of him or did they privately scoff because his only real success was being his father’s son? Would they view his marriage of a servant girl more proof of irresponsibility? Could he go ahead a marry the wealthy daughter and go Old Testament with a second wife? 

He thought about this business trip he was on. He hadn’t thought his father’s instructions were the most profitable. He thinks that he could have traded differently and made more money. In fact, he could have kept the extra profit for himself and began amassing his own fortune. He could eventually branch out on his own and prove his worth was more than just as his father’s son. He could prove it to his brother, the neighbors, the riotous friends, this servant girl who probably only pretends to like him because of his money – his father’s money.

We can see where this is going. The Prodigal Son is on his way. The sin has been conceived in the fertile ground of his mind. We can fill in the blanks for what he’s going to wind up doing, or each of us could fill in the blank for what we would be in danger of doing…for what our next big Do-Over would be. 

How do I make my next Do-Over the last one? Better yet, how do I make my last Do-Over, my last Do-Over? How do I take captive all those “How Do You Like Me Now” comparisons and desires and envies and performances? 

The answer…Love God. How’s that for a good Sunday School answer? I know what you’re thinking—how do we do that…really? What is the practical path to love that which I can’t always see or hear or know? What I have started doing is remembering who I am without Him. I am Pig-Sty Boy. With my mind on the Father, and who He is, and what He has done, I am Prodigal Son, basking in the Do-Over. With my mind wandering all over everybody else, I am Pig-Sty Boy with another Do-Over on the horizon.

Loving God, chasing hard after God through prayer and reading the Bible and making others more important, cause the “How do you like me now” rabbit trails of my wandering heart to grow over with weeds. 

The weed eater is always nearby, I just can’t…pick…it…up.

 Jesus said to him, “You shall love the Lord Your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind.” Matthew 22:37

“But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.” Matthew 6:33

     

Why Not Fly?

Mark Johnston, Connections Pastor 

RobinThe other morning, while I was drinking my coffee, I looked out the back door and saw a bird, a male robin, walking down the sidewalk, like he was just out for a stroll. It seemed a little strange, so I watched him for a minute. He had a twig in his mouth, which I assumed was going to be used for a nest. Now, our yard is a veritable Home Depot of bird nest building materials, with a dozen or so trees, that drop limbs every time there’s a light breeze in the forecast. There’s a majestic old pecan, some stately oaks, and a few catalpa trees, which I’m convinced line the banks of the mythical river Styx in Hell, dropping crap year ‘round.

Anyway, the bird walked, slowly, like an elderly person, along the sidewalk from our shed to the driveway, a good twenty feet or so, probably looking to do some sort of twig upgrade. It was a long enough distance that I started to wonder if there was something wrong with him, maybe a problem with one of his wings, so I sat down my coffee mug, opened the door, and startled him, so he took off into the air. (And yes, honey, I used a coaster.)

So, after he flew off, I started to wonder, “why in the world would you walk when you can fly?”

As people, most of us dream of having the ability to fly. Some folks literally have flying dreams at night. (I’ve unfortunately never been one of those people, and have always been kind of envious of them. Instead, I get drowning dreams.) Here was this little guy, blessed by his Creator with an ability so amazing—one that he takes for granted, and that his peanut-sized brain can’t really fathom—walking to his destination instead of soaring in the clouds like you and I would do, just for a minute, even if we had no reason to do so.

He’d been blessed with a gift from God, and wasn’t using it.

As believers, we have also been given something incredible—the indwelling of the Holy Spirit of God Himself. (1 Corinthians 3:16-17) Think about it. In Old Testament times, God’s Spirit dwelled in the Tabernacle, or later, in the Temple, once it was constructed. The indwelling of the Spirit in people in the Old Testament was selective and it was temporary. 

The Spirit “came upon” people like Joshua (Numbers 27:18), David (1 Samuel 16:12-13) and even Saul (1 Samuel 10:10). In the book of Judges, we see the Spirit “coming upon” the various judges whom God raised up to deliver Israel from their oppressors. The Holy Spirit entered into these folks for specific tasks and for certain periods of time. This indwelling was a sign of God’s favor (in the case of David), and if they fell out of God’s favor, the Spirit would depart (Saul in 1 Samuel 16:14).

It was not until Pentecost in Acts 2, that the Holy Spirit, as Jesus had promised to the disciples before He ascended into heaven, filled the believers. Not as a temporary blessing, but a permanent one.

“When the day of Pentecost arrived, they were all together in one place. And suddenly there came from heaven a sound like a mighty rushing wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. And divided tongues as of fire appeared to them and rested on each one of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance.” (Acts 2:1-4)

From that point on, the once timid disciples, the very same men who ran and hid when the authorities arrived that night in Gethsemane, spoke boldly of the risen Christ, with no fear of arrest, persecution or even death. They had spent three years walking alongside Jesus in his ministry, witnessing his miracles, hearing his teachings, but it was the indwelling of the Spirit that really changed them.

So in the Old Testament, outside of a few special instances, the Holy Spirit did not live inside God’s people, and when it did, it was only for a season. As incredible as that sounds, you and I have something that Noah, Moses, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Daniel, David, Elijah and Elisha did not—the very Spirit of God living inside us.

Picture yourself in Heaven, finding one of your Old Testament heroes…Moses, for example. Excitedly, you ask him what it was like to see the burning bush, to lead God’s people out of bondage, showing God’s power to the rulers of Egypt, or receive the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai.

What if Moses’ response was something like, “yeah that was cool and all, but I want to know what it was like to have the Holy Spirit living inside you?”

Imagine his reaction be to our typical American Christian answer of “you know…It really didn’t affect me a whole lot. In our culture we liked to shop for clothes and binge TV shows on this thing called Netflix and I worked a lot so we could have a bigger house and nicer cars, and go on vacations and cruises and attend sporting events.”

Church, we have the indwelling of Holy Spirit, and we’re walking around picking up twigs to build bigger nests. 

I can’t help but feel that we will one day look back at our fascination with the shiny objects this world has to offer—sex, materialism, even the ‘your best life now’ promise of the TV preachers with nothing but regret and remorse. It’s like we are the Indians, trading the Island of Manhattan for a few dollars worth of trinkets.

God wants so much more for us, as his beloved children. Not ‘blessings’ in the way so many have been taught to think of them, so much as the abundant life of obedience. Of dying to ourselves in order to live for Him, to take up our crosses and follow. To see those in need, and truly hurt for them, share their burdens, and do our part to help lift them up, sharing our own stories of redemption as part of someone else’s healing process.

That’s what the church should be. 

As Hebrews 12:1-2 says “Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God”

Church, we have the Spirit of God. Why are we walking?