Count it All Joy?

Josh McCullough, Stonepoint Member

A good commercial has a sticking factor. A phrase or ear-worm that gets stuck in your memory. Growing up, one such commercial was the one for Space Bags. I remember the frustrated lady screaming ‘Too much stuff, not enough space!’ 

It’s part of our human nature to desire stuff. We collect and amass and still desire more. It could be books, jewelry, cars, trinkets and art, clothes, etc. My own personal vices are Legos and electronics.  

8fbaa9b5-8d8e-4e14-bc63-c91a878482be-shutterstock_9769461cjIt is common in American households to have junk drawers, you know the one…that drawer or cabinet full of stuff that doesn’t really have a place but that we’re not yet ready to throw out. 

Well my ‘junk drawer’ is an entire room, and no, I don’t mean my teenage daughter’s room (although it’s pretty close). The room in question is an office space off our master bedroom that has become more of a storage room than a usable office.  

We have definitely hit the point of ‘Too much stuff, not enough space!’, not quite hoarder status (although my wife might argue that point).

There is a Japanese custom for decluttering that has resurfaced and made it west in recent years, popularized by Marie Kondo. Essentially the custom is to hold each of your possessions in your hand and only keep the items that bring you joy. I’m sure that over simplifies it, but it’s the basic gist.   

Seems easy enough, go through everything and take a moment to see if it sparks joy. A beloved heirloom with pleasant memories attached, the little trinket gift your child made in school with their hand prints for Mother’s Day, that pair of headphones that are balanced just right for music or audio books (just me?) You get the idea. 

 Now I see memes online where people talk about throwing out their electric bills, dirty laundry, dirty dishes, etc. 

This falls in line with a worldly definition of joy, a feeling of great pleasure and happiness. In other words if something doesn’t make you happy, throw it away. 

The problem with using happiness as your guide is where do you draw the line? 

A $400 a month electric bill doesn’t make me happy, the same with endless piles of laundry or dirty dishes. 

The book of James opens with these words, ‘Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds’ James 1:2 ESV. 

So what is a biblical definition of joy? Surely James isn’t telling us to be happy that we’re suffering. 

Biblical joy is definitely a feeling, but not necessarily a feeling of happiness. 

Paul in his letter to the church in Thessalonica used the word as a verb in the form of rejoice and gave us a pretty good definition of biblical joy. ‘Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not despise prophecies, but test everything; hold fast what is good. Abstain from every form of evil.’  1 Thessalonians 5:16-22 ESV. 

Notice in verse 18 he says ‘give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.’ 

In other words be grateful. 

Proverbs 17:22 says ‘A joyful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones.’ Or if I may be so bold as to paraphrase, Being grateful heals, while grumbling destroys. 

So what happens if we use the biblical definition of joy and apply it to the Marie Kondo method?

Suddenly instead of that electric bill that I was not happy about, I can be grateful that I have electricity and by extension a comfortable place for my family to live. Instead of dreading the endless piles of laundry and never-ending dishes, I can be grateful that my family has clothes to wear and food to eat. 

And that’s just when applied to physical objects, but what about the argument you had with your spouse, or a disobedient action from a child. Sure these are things, but they also aren’t making you happy so we discard them. We jump headfirst into divorce, we kick kids out of the house or send them away. 

After all isn’t getting rid of relationships and the people involved the ultimate decluttering? There’s a billboard on I-20 between Grand Prairie and Duncanville, that if I’m honest, makes me angry every time I see it. It is an ad for a divorce lawyer that says in big, bold letters: “DOUBLE YOUR CLOSET SPACE.” In other words throw them and their stuff to the curb. 

Society, or as it is referred to many times in the bible ‘The World’, tells us it’s ok for relationships to be disposable. The world would have you look at the people you’re in relationship with as objects, no more valuable than the straw you’re not allowed to possess in California. The world encourages this reckless abandon for people while heavily pushing recycling of trash to help the environment. 

Not that helping the environment is a bad thing, in fact as Christians we should be concerned with the Earth that God has given us as our temporary home. But that’s just it God designed the Earth, the skies, and the heavens to be temporary. He will replace these in the end, but relationships were designed by God to be forever. 

1 Corinthians 13:7-8 says it this way ‘Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away.’ 

Instead of disposing of relationships in a time of struggle, we should renew our love for one another. In doing so we can place the appropriate value on each other and focus on decluttering where it really matters. 

Clean out the junk drawer (or room in my case), and be grateful for the people God has placed in your life.  

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